Army Jiim Assignments

JIIM training (joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational): challenges in the geographic combatant commands.

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Collection Center for Army Lessons Learned Repository
Title JIIMtraining(joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational): challenges in the geographiccombatantcommands.
Author Blakeman, Karen, (ed.)
Abstract The followingcollection of articlesfocus on U.S. joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational(JIIM)activities, challenges, issues, and operations in the sixU.S. geographiccombatantcommands(GCCs). Today, stabilityoperations in Afghanistan and Iraqrightfullyreceive the lion’sshare of attention, priority, and mediacoverage. There are, however, manyotherchallenges, potentialdangers, and futurethreats in the otherfiveGCCs that meritattention and continuousobservation and evaluation. The GCCsoperate in challenging and complexenvironments, tackling a vastarray of JIIMchallenges and issueseachday. The intent of the Center for ArmyLessonsLearned(CALL)is to illustratesome of the currentchallenges in this newsletter and highlightoperations at the strategic or theaterlevels. This newslettercontainsthreeoverviewJIIMarticles. The remainingarticleshighlightchallenges or issuesspecific to one of the GCCs; several were written by the GCCcommanders. These articlescover a widerange of issues with the specificintent of informing the reader and sharingchallenges, bestpractices, and lessonslearned. The articles should not be consideredallinclusive. Topicsinclude: •Buildingpartnershipcapacity. •Full-spectrumoperations. •Planning for potentiallyfailingstates. •Integratingcivilian and militaryactivities. •JIIMexercises and training. •Drug and humantrafficking. •Piracy. •Transnationalthreats. •Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclearthreats. •Disasterresponse. •Homelandsecurity. •Establishingprofessionalrelationships. The articles in this newsletter—drawn from recentissues of professionaljournals or CALL and otherjointarchives and websites— were selected to capturecurrent, relevant, JIIMarticles that will informSoldiers and leaders on challenges and issues and provide a usefuldocument for personnelassigned to JIIMpositions in the future. ManyJIIMchallenges are unique to a particulargeographicregion; others are sharedchallenges. If there is an overridingpriority or theme to this collection, itiscertainly the goal of buildingpartnershipcapacity. This appears to be the toppriority in each of the GCCs. Manyideaspresented in these articles are personalopinion, and somemay not be approvedArmydoctrine. The recommendations in these articles should always be validated with the latestapprovedjoint and Armydoctrine. CALLacknowledges and thanks the authors, professionaljournals, managingeditors, and publicaffairspersonnelwhoassisted in obtaining and reprinting these articles. Minormodifications to format were made to support the CALLnewsletterformat. In someinstances, pictures that were not referenced in the narrative were deleted to savespace and detailedbiographies were removed to avoid the release of personalinformation.
Keyword JIIM; Jointinteragencycoordinationintergovernmentalorganizationmultinationaloperations
Series CALLNewsletter
Publisher Fort Leavenworth, KS : Center for Army Lessons Learned CALL,
Date, Original 2011-03
Date, Digital 2011
Resource Type Textual
Format PDF; Adobe Reader required; 150 p.; 1.38 MB.
Call number CALLNewsletterno. 11-23
Language eng
Release statement Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Repository Combined Arms Research Library
Library Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library

Command Teams are responsible for effectively using available resources and for planning the employment of, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling military forces for the accomplishment of assigned missions. Command Teams share the responsibility for health, welfare, morale, and discipline of assigned personnel (see JP 1-02).


Purpose

The goal of the non commissioned officer education system (NCOES) is to produce leaders who are fully competent in technical, tactical, and leadership skills, knowledge, and experience; are knowledgeable of how the Army runs; are prepared to operate in a joint interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (JIIM) environments; demonstrate confidence, integrity, critical judgment, and responsibility; can operate in an environment of complexity, ambiguity, and rapid change; can build effective teams amid organizational and technological change; and can adapt to and solve problems creatively.


Conditions:

Through the three pillars of leader development (education, training and experience) and mentoring from their superiors, NCOs are positioned to assume senior positions and lead their respective formations in a JIIM environment.


Facts

  • Prior to 3rd Quarter FY-11 1SG’S Designees are required to complete the First Sergeant Course within 12 months of assuming the 1SG duties.
  • 1SG’S Designees who completed Senior Leaders Course(SLC) prior to 1 October 2011 and who have not attended the First Sergeant Course are required to complete the First Sergeant distance learning(DL)modules.
  • Starting 4th quarter FY-13, 1SG’S Designees are required to complete the Company Commander First Sergeant Course (19 Tasks) prior to assuming command.
  • School of Command Preparation (SCP) courses are classified Tier 1 for Professional Military Education (PME)

Assumptions

TAGs will announce Command Teams at least nine months (target 12 months) in advance of the change of command to afford command teams the opportunity to complete additional PME and applicable functional training.

1SG

1SG: Company grade NCO’s combine all three pillars of leader development (education, training and experience) to prepare for 1SG positions. The 1SG is the company’s senior NCO and normally is its most experienced soldier. He is the commander’s primary CSS and tactical advisor and he is an expert in individual and NCO skills. He is the company’s primary internal CSS operator and helps the commander and support operations officer to plan, coordinate, and supervise all logistical activities that support the company’s mission. He operates where the commander directs or where his duties require him. The following guidelines are provided for MTOE 1SG positions. Education. A Senior NCO would have completed the Senior Leaders Course(SLC) and once a command designee, completes the 19 directed tasks through the Company Commander First Sergeant course through distributed learning (dL) (CCFSC), resident CCFSC sponsored by the host State, or a blended learning approach that combines both dL and resident. Experience and Training. A Senior NCO should possess at least one Key developmental (KD) position and preferably two or three KD assignments. Traditional KD assignments include Platoon Sergeant, and Operations NCO. Additional broadening assignment(s) enhances training and experience. These broadening assignments may include but are not limited Recruiting and Retention Duty, Drill Sergeant Duty and Instructor Duty. Selection for Company 1SG. It is the responsibility of the senior leaders of each State to not only select competent company 1SG’s, but to also ensure they have been provided the requisite training, education, experience and mentoring to successfully lead. In addition, company 1SG selectees should be notified at least six months in advance of the change of command to afford the designee’s time to reflect, complete any additional PME (CCFSC) and functional training, and prepare one’s command philosophy. This time will also allow the designee to become familiar with the Company and higher headquarters.

BATTALION CSM

Battalion Command Sergeant Major: Senior Grade NCO’s combine all three pillars of leader development (education, training and experience) to prepare for a Battalion Command Sergeant Major (CSM) position. The following guidelines are provided for MTOE and TDA battalion commands. Education. CSM must be enrolled in or graduates of the United States Army Sergeant Major Course. CSM must also complete the Battalion Commander/CSM course at Fort Leavenworth, KS. Experience and Training. CSMs should possess at least one Key developmental (KD) position (preferably two). Traditional KD assignments include Operations Sergeant (E8), Company First Sergeant (E-8), Platoon Sergeant/Section Chief (E-7), Section Leader (E-6), or Squad Leader (E-5). Additional broadening assignment(s) enhances training and experience. These broadening assignments may include but are not limited to other primary staff assignments at the battalion and brigade levels; Division staff, Regional Training Institute; or Troop Command / JTF-State HQ. Selection for Battalion Command Sergeant Major. It is the responsibility of the senior leaders of each State to not only select competent CSMs, but to also ensure they have been provided the requisite training, education, experience and mentoring to successfully execute their duties. In addition, battalion CSM selectees should be notified at least nine months (preferably 12 months) in advance of the change of responsibility to afford the designee time to reflect, complete any additional PME (SCP PCC Phase(s)), and prepare CSM philosophy. This time will also allow the designee to become familiar with the Battalion and higher headquarters.

BRIGADE CSM

Brigade Command Sergeant Major:Education. CSM must be enrolled in or graduates of the United States Army Sergeant Major Course. CSM must also complete the Battalion Commander/CSM course at Fort Leavenworth, KS. Experience and Training. CSMs should possess at least one Key developmental (KD) position (preferably two). Traditional KD assignments include Battalion CSM (E-9), Operations Sergeant (E8), Company First Sergeant (E-8), Platoon Sergeant/Section Chief (E-7), Section Leader (E-6), or Squad Leader (E-5). Additional broadening assignment(s) enhances training and experience. These broadening assignments may include but are not limited to other primary staff assignments at the battalion and brigade levels; Division staff, Regional Training Institute; or Troop Command / JTF-State HQ. Selection for Brigade Command Sergeant Major. It is the responsibility of the senior leaders of each State to not only select competent CSMs, but to also ensure they have been provided the requisite training, education, experience and mentoring to successfully execute their duties. In addition, brigade CSM selectees should be notified at least nine months (preferably 12 months) in advance of the change of responsibility to afford the designee time to reflect, complete any additional PME (SCP PCC Phase(s)), and prepare CSM philosophy. This time will also allow the designee to become familiar with the Brigade and higher headquarters.

GENERAL OFFICER NOMINATIVE

General Officer Nominative Assignment:Education. CSM must be enrolled in or graduates of the United States Army Sergeant Major Course. CSM must also complete the Battalion Commander/CSM course at Fort Leavenworth, KS. Experience and Training. CSMs should possess at least one Key developmental (KD) position (preferably two). Traditional KD assignments include Brigade CSM (E-9), Battalion CSM (E-9), Operations Sergeant (E8), Company First Sergeant (E-8), Platoon Sergeant/Section Chief (E-7), Section Leader (E-6), or Squad Leader (E-5). Additional broadening assignment(s) enhances training and experience. These broadening assignments may include but are not limited to other primary staff assignments at the battalion and brigade levels; Division staff, Regional Training Institute; or Troop Command / JTF-State HQ. Selection for General Officer Nominative Assignment. It is the responsibility of the senior leaders of each State to not only select competent CSMs, but to also ensure they have been provided the requisite training, education, experience and mentoring to successfully execute their duties. In addition, Nominative CSM selectees should be notified at least nine months (preferably 12 months) in advance of the change of responsibility to afford the designee time to reflect, complete any additional PME (SCP PCC Phase(s)), and prepare CSM philosophy. This time will also allow the designee to become familiar with the Division and higher headquarters.

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