Gregory Vlastos Bibliography Meaning

Bibliography of Feminist Philosophers Writing about the History of Philosophy

This Bibliography was first constructed by Abigail Gosselin, who maintained it until 2006. In 2015, it was revised and restructured by Rosalind Chaplin and Emily Hodges.

The bibliography begins with a general section of sources that span historical periods. The sections that follow are organized by historical period. Each section begins with a set of general sources for the period. It then lists philosophers from the period in alphabetical order with sources proper to those figures. With respect to secondary sources, this bibliography focuses on material written in English.

This 2015 revision includes substantial additions through the 18th Century. The 19th through 20th Century sections have not been substantially revised since 2006. Some annotations are provided, especially for general sources. These annotations, however, may not include complete information regarding the figures covered in the volume.


General

Books

  • Antony, Louise and Charlotte Witt (eds.), 1993. A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Alanen, Lilli and Charlotte Witt (eds.), 2004. Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, Dordrecht/Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Atherton, Margaret, 1994. Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Hackett Publishing Co. [Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Viscountess Conway, Damaris Cudworth (Lady Masham), Mary Astell, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, and Lady Mary Shepherd.]
  • Bar On, Bat-Ami (ed.), 1994. Modern Engendering: Critical Feminist Readings in Modern Western Philosophy, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Broad, Jacqueline and Karen Green, 2009. A history of women's political thought in Europe, 1400–1700, Cambridge University Press. [Explicitly focuses on Pizan, de Beaujeu, de Navarre, Queen Elizabeth of England, de Gournay, Scudery, Cavendish, Astell. Other sections are on groups of women.]
  • Broad, Jacqueline and Karen Green (eds.), 2007. Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideals of European Women (1400–1800), Netherlands: Springer. [Includes chapters specifically dedicated to Margaret Cavendish, Damaris Cudworth Masham, Mary Astell, Elizabeth Carter, Catherine Macauley, and Mary Wollstonecraft.]
  • Case, Bettye Anne and Anne M. Leggett (eds.), 2005. Complexities: Women in Mathematics, Princeton University Press.
  • Coole, Diana H., 1988. Women in Political Theory: From Ancient Misogyny to Contemporary Feminism, Sussex: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Couchman, Jane and Ann Crabb (eds.), 2005. Women's Letters Across Europe, 1400–1700: Form and Persuasion, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Churchill, L.J., P.R. Brown and J. E. Jeffrey (eds.), 2002. Women Writing Latin: From Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe, New York: Routledge. [Also listed under Isotta Nagarola]
  • Cornell, Drucilla, 1993. Transformations: Recollective Imagination and Sexual Difference, New York: Routledge.
  • Deutscher, Penelope, 1997. Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy, London and New York: Routledge.
  • Duran, Jane, 2006. Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism, Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press. [Includes chapters on Hildegard of Bingen, Anne Conway, Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, plus some later women.]
  • Dykeman, Therese Boos (ed.), 1999. The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers from the First to the Twentieth Century, Kluwer Academic Publishers. [Includes discussion of Astell, de la Cruz, de Gourney, van Schurman, and others.]
  • Elshtain, Jean Bethke (ed.), 1982. The Family in Political Thought, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Ferguson, Moira, 1993. Colonialism and Gender Relations from Mary Wollstonecraft to Jamaica Kincaid: East Caribbean Connections, New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Frye, Marilyn, 1992. The Possibility of Feminist Theory, Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press.
  • Fuss, Diana, 1989. Essentially Speaking, New York: Routledge.
  • Gardner, Catherine Villanueva, 2006. Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy, Metuchen: Scarecrow Press.
  • Gatens, Moira, 1991. Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Gould, Carol C. and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), 1976. Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Grimshaw, Jean, 1986. Feminist Philosophers: Women's Perspectives on Philosophical Traditions, Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books.
  • Harding, Sandra and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), 1983. Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Harding, Sandra, 1986. The Science Question in Feminism, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Heyes, C. J. (ed.), 2012. Philosophy and Gender (Critical Concepts in Philosophy Series), Routledge. [Has a Section on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.]
  • Holland, Nancy J., 1998. The Madwoman's Reason: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Hunter, Lynette and Sarah Hutton (eds.), 1997. Women, science and medicine 1500–1700: mothers and sisters of the Royal Society, Sutton Publishing.
  • Inglis, Laura Lyn and Peter K. Steinfeld, 2000. Old Dead White Men's Philosophy, Amherst: Humanity Books.
  • Jones, Gregory L. and Stephen E. Fowl (eds.), 1995. Rethinking Metaphysics, Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Kale, S, 2004. French salons: high society and political sociability from the Old Regime to the Revolution of 1848, Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Keller, Evelyn Fox, 1985. Reflections on Gender and Science, New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Kersey, Ethel M., 1989. Women Philosophers: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook. Greenwood Press, in Lilly Library, REF/B/105/.W6/K4.7/1989. [Briefly describes 170 women from before 1920.]
  • King, M.L. and A. Rabil Jr., 1983. Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies. [Includes many primary texts of Cassandra Fedele and Laura Cereta among others.]
  • Kittay, Eva Feder and Linda Martín Alcoff (eds.), 2008. The Blackwell guide to feminist philosophy, John Wiley and sons.
  • Korsmeyer, Carolyn, 2004. Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction, New York: Routledge.
  • Kourany, Janet A., 1998. Philosophy in a Feminist Voice: Critiques and Reconstructions, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7s6sv [Includes Astell, de Gourney, de Grouchy, Guyon, Marie Huber, Amalia Holst, Bathsua Makin, Panckoucke, Sister Jacqueline Pascal, Gabrielle Suchon, Fanny Raoul, and others.]
  • LeDoeuff, Michele, 1991. Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc, Trista Selous (trans.), Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1993. The Man of Reason: “Male” and “Female” in Western Philosophy, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve (ed.), 2002. Feminism and History of Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Mahowald, Mary, 1983. The Philosophy of Woman, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Matthes, Melissa M., 2000. The Rape of Lucretia and the Founding of Republics: Readings in Livy, Machiavelli, and Rousseau, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • McAlister, Linda Lopez (ed.) 1996. Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Menage, Gilles, 1984. The History of Women Philosophers, Beatrice H. Zedler (trans.), Lanham: University Press of America.
  • Moscovici, Claudia, 1996. From Sex Objects to Sexual Subjects, New York: Routledge.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1988. Feminist Theory and the Philosophies of Man, London: Croom Helm.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1979. Women in Western Political Thought, Princeton: University of Princeton Press.
  • O’Neill, Eileen and M. Lascano (eds.), 2014. Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women's Philosophical Thought, Dordrecht:Springer.
  • Osen, Lynn, 1974. Women in Mathematics, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. [Includes chapters on de Agnesi, Marquise du Chatelet, Caroline Herschel, Sophie Germain, Mary Fairfax Somerville, Sonya Corvin-Krukovsky Kovalevsky, and Amy (Amalie) Noether.]
  • Pande, Rekha, 2010. Divine Sounds from the Heart-Singing Unfettered in Their Own Voices: The Bhakti Movement and Its Women Saints (12th to 17th Century), Cambridge Scholars Pub.
  • Panizza, L. and S. Wood., 2000. A History of Women's Writing in Italy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [From the early Renaissance to 2000.]
  • Rorty, Richard, J. B. Schneewind, and Quentin Skinner (eds.), 1984. Philosophy in History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Soper, Kate, 1995. What is Nature? Culture, Politics, and the Non Human, Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011. Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth, 1988. Inessential Woman: Problems of Exclusion in Feminist Thought, Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1993. The Less Noble Sex: Scientific, Religious, and Philosophical Conceptions of Woman's Nature, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1992. Woman and the History of Philosophy, New York: Paragon House.
  • Tuana, Nancy (ed.), 1994–. Re-Reading the Canon Series, Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Waithe, Mary Ellen (ed.), 1987–1991. A History of Women Philosophers, Vol. 1–3, Kluwer Academic Publishing.
  • Warnock, Mary (ed.), 1996. Women Philosophers, London: J. M. Dent.
  • Warren, Mary Anne, 1980. The Nature of Woman: An Encyclopaedia and Guide to the Literature, Reyes, CA: Edgepress.
  • Warren, Karen (ed.), 2009. An unconventional history of Western philosophy: conversations between men and women philosophers, Rowman & Littlefield. [Includes primary sources for Hildegard of Bingen, as well as Princess Elisabeth, Macualay, Masham, Conway, Wollstonecraft, van Schurman.]
  • Zinsser, Judith P (ed.), 2005. Men, Women, and the Birthing of Modern Science, DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.

Articles

  • Atherton, Margaret, n.d. “Doing the History of Philosophy as a Feminist,” American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy, L. Antony and D. Meyers (eds.).
  • Bell, Linda A., 1984. “Gallantry: What it is and Why it Should Not Survive,” Southwestern Journal of Philosophy, 22: 165–174.
  • Code, Lorraine, 1986. “Simple Equality is Not Enough,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp., 64.
  • Finucci, V., 2005. “In the Footsteps of Petrarch,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 35(3): 457–466. [Discusses Isotta Nogarola as well as Renaissance women such as Laura Cereta.]
  • Kelly, Joan, 1988. “Early Feminist Theory and the Querelle des Femmes: 1400–1789,” in Women, History, Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 65–109.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1979. “The Man of Reason,” Metaphilosophy, 10(1): 18–37.
  • Lloyd, Genevieve, 1993. “Maleness, Metaphor, and the ‘Crisis’ of Reason,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 69–84.
  • Monter, E. William, 1980. “Women in Calvinist Geneva (1550–1800),” Signs, 6(2): 189–209. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/stable/3173922.
  • Olkowski, Dorothea, 1997. “Materiality and Language: Butler's Interrogation of the History of Philosophy,” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 23(3): 37–53.
  • Parsons, Susan Frank, 2004. “To Be or Not To Be: Gender and Ontology,” in Heythrop Journal: A Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology, 45(3): 327–343.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 1991. “Gendered Reason: Sex, Metaphor and Conceptions of Reason,” Hypatia, 6(2): 77–103.
  • Rooney, Phyllis, 1994. “Recent Work in Feminist Discussions of Reason,” American Philosophical Quarterly, 31(1): 1–21.
  • Scheman, Naomi, 1993. “Though This Be Method, Yet There Is Madness in It: Paranoia and Liberal Epistemology,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 177–207.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1988. “The Weaker Seed: The Sexist Bias of Reproductive Theory,” Hypatia, 3: 35–59.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 1993. “Feminist Metaphysics,” in A Mind of One’s Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity, Antony and Witt (eds.), Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 273–288.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 2006. “Feminist Interpretations of the Philosophical Canon,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 31(2): 537–552.
  • Wolff, Robert Paul, 1976. “There's Nobody Here But Us Persons,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Ancient

General

Books

  • Allen, P.,1997. The concept of woman: The Aristotelian revolution, 750 BC-AD 1250, Vol. 1, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. [Discusses the concept of women in the writings of philosophers of the time.]
  • Archer, L. S. Fischler and M. Wyke (eds.), 1994. Women in Ancient Socieities, London: Routledge.
  • Bar-On, Bat Ami (ed.), 1994. Engendering Origins: Critical Feminist Readings in Plato and Aristotle, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • DuBois, Page, 1998. Sowing the Body: Psychoanalysis and Ancient Representations of Women, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Mahowald, Mary Briody (ed.), 1983. Philosophy of Woman: An Anthology of Classic and Current Concepts, Second Edition, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1986. The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Peradotto, J. and J. P. Sullivan (eds.), 1984. Women in the Ancient World: The Arethusa Papers, Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1975. Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, New York: Schocken Books.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1984. Women in Hellenistic Egypt: From Alexander to Cleopatra, New York: Schocken Books.
  • Rabinowitz, Nancy, 1993. Anxiety Veiled: Euripides and the Traffic in Women, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Rabinowitz, Nancy, 1993. Feminist Theory and the Classics, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Snyder, Jane, 1988. The Women and the Lyre: Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome, Carbondale: South Illinois University Press.
  • Ward, Julie K., 1996. Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Wright, F. A., 1969. Feminism in Greek Literature: From Homer to Aristotle, Port Washington: Kennikat Press.

Articles

  • Arthur, Marilyn, 1984. “Early Greece: The Origin of the Western Attitude Toward Women,” in Women and the Ancient World: The Arethusa Paper, J. Perradotto and J. P. Sullivan (eds.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Asmis, Elizabeth, 1996. “The Stoics on Women,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Brumbaugh, Robert and John Burnham, 1989. “Coins and Classical Philohophy,” Teaching Philosophy, 12: 243–255.
  • Connell, Sophia M., 2000. “Aristotle and Galen on Sex Difference and Reproduction: A New Approach to an Ancient Rivalry,” in Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 31A(3): 405–427.
  • Freeland, Cynthia, 2000. “Feminism and Ideology in Ancient Philosophy,” in Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science, 33(4): 365–406.
  • Gottner Abendroth, Heide, 1991. The Dancing Goddess: Principles of a Matriarchal Aesthetic, Maureen T. Krause (trans.), Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Hawkesworth, Mary E., 1987. “Re/Vision: Feminist Theory Confronts the Polis,” Social Theory and Practice, 13: 155–186.
  • Katz, Marilyn, 1992. “Ideology and ‘The Status of Women’ in Ancient Greece,” History and Theory, 31(4): 70–97.
  • Kotzin, Rhoda Hadassah, 1998. “Ancient Greek Philosophy,” in A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Cambridge: Blackwell.
  • Molinaro, Ursule, 1989. “A Christian Martyr in Reverse Hypatia: 370–415 A.D.,” Hypatia, 4: 6–8.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1996. “Therapeutic Arguments and Structures of Desire,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Perez-Estevez, Antonio, 1986. “Feminidad Y Racionalidad En El Pensamiento Griego,” Rev. Filosof (Venezuela), 9: 167–199.
  • Skinner, Marilyn (ed.), 1987. “Rescuing Creusa: New Methodological Approaches to Women in Antiquity,” Special Issue of Helios, 13(2).
  • Smith, Nicholas, 1983. “Plato and Aristotle on the Nature of Women,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 21: 467–478.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth, 1984. “Anger and Insubordination,” in Beyond Domination: New Perspectives on Women and Philosophy, Carol Gould (ed.), Totowa NJ: Rowman & Allanheld.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1982. “Woman as Body: Ancient and Contemporary View,” Feminist Studies, 8: 109–131.
  • Thompson, Patricia J., 1996. “Re-Claiming Hestia: Goddess of Everyday Life,” Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 3(4): 20–28.
  • Thompson, Patricia J., 2000. “Hestian Thinking in Antiquity and Modernity: Pythagorean Women Philosophers and 19th Century Domestic Scientists,” in Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 7(2–3): 71–82.
  • Wartenberg, Thomas E., 1988. “Teaching Women Philosophy,” Teaching Philosophy, 11: 15–24.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Wider, Kathleen, 1986. “Women Philosophers in the Ancient World: Donning the Mantle,” Hypatia, 1: 21–62.
  • Wiseman, Mary Bittner, 1993. “Beautiful Exiles in Aesthetics,” in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, Hilde Hein (ed.), Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 169–178.

Aristotle

Books

  • Bickford, Susan, 1996. The Dissonance of Democracy: Listening, Conflict, and Citizenship, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1975. Aristotle on Emotion: A Contribution to Philosophical Psychology, Rhetoric, Poetics, Politics, and Ethics, New York: Harper & Row.
  • Freeland, Cynthia, 1998. Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Holland, Nancy, 1998. The Madwoman's Dream: The Concept of the Appropriate in Ethical Thought, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Tessman, Lisa, 2005. Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles (Studies in Feminist Philosophy), New York: Oxford University Press.

Articles

  • Achtenberg, Deborah, 1996. “Aristotelian Resources for Feminist Thinking,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Achtenberg, Deborah, 1989. “The Role of the Ergon Argument in Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics,” Ancient Philosophy, 9(1).
  • Allen, Christine Garside, 1971. “Can a Woman be Good in the Same Way as a Man?” Dialogue, 10: 534–544.
  • Berman, Ruth, 1989. “From Aristotle's Dualism to Materialist Dialectics: Feminist Transformation of Science and Society,” in Gender/Body/Knowledge: Feminist Reconstructions of Being and Knowing, Alison M. Jaggar and Susan R. Bordo (eds.), New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
  • Cavarero, Adriana, 1992. “Equality and Sexual Difference,” in Beyond Equality and Difference, Gisela Bock (ed.), New York: Routledge.
  • Cole, Eve Browning, 1994. “’Women, Slaves, and Love of Toil’ in Aristotle's Moral Philosophy,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Cook, Kathleen C., 1996. “Sexual Inequality in Aristotle's Theories of Reproduction and Inheritance,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.),New York and London: Routledge.
  • Curd, Patricia, 1996. “Aristotelian Visions of Moral Character in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Curran, Angela, 1998. “Feminism and the Narrative Structures of the ‘Poetics,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Deslauriers, Marguerite, 1998. “Sex and Essence in Aristotle's ‘Metaphysics’ and ‘Biology,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Deslauriers, Marguerite, 2009. “Sexual Difference in Aristotle's Politics and His Biology,” Classical World, 102(3): 215–231.
  • Fememias, Maria Luisa, 1994. “Women and Natural Hierarchy in Aristotle,” Hypatia, 9(1): 164–172.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1977. “Aristotle on Slaves and Women,” in Articles on Aristotle: 2, Ethics and Politics, J. Barnes, J. Schofield, and R. Sorabji (eds.), London: Duckworth.
  • Freeland, Cynthia A., 1994. “Nourishing Speculation: A Feminist Reading of Aristotelian Science,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Freeland, Cynthia A., 1988. “On Irigaray on Aristotle,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press, 1998.
  • Green, Judith, 1992. “Aristotle on Necessary Verticality, Body Heat, and Gendered Proper Places in the Polis: A Feminist Critique,” Hypatia, 7(1): 70–96.
  • Groenhout, Ruth, 1998. “The Virtue of Care: Aristotelian Ethics and Contemporary Ethics of Care,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Halwani, Raja, 2003. “Care Ethics and Virtue Ethics,” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 18(3): 160–192.
  • Hass, Marjorie, 1998. “Feminist Readings of Aristotelian Logic,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Hein, Hilde, 1989. “Liberating Philosophy: An End to the Dichotomy of Spirit and Matter,” in Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, Ann Garry and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Boston: Unwin Hyman.
  • Henry, Devin M., 2007. “How Sexist is Aristotle's Developmental Biology?,” Phronesis, 52: 251–269.
  • Hirschman, Linda Redlick, 1998. “The Book of ‘A,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Nielsen, Karen, 2008. “The Private Parts of Animals: Aristotle on the Teleology of Sexual Difference,” Phronesis, 53: 373–405.
  • Homiak, Marcia, 1996. “Feminism and Aristotle's Rational Ideal,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Horowitz, Maryanne Cline, 1976. “Aristotle and Women,” Journal of the History of Biology, 9: 183–213.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1998. “Place, Interval: A Reading of Aristotle's ‘Physics IV,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Krebs, Angelika, 2000. “Freundschaft und Liebe bei Aristoteles und Hugh LaFollette,” in Dialektik: Zeitschrift fuer kulturphilosophie, 1: 149–166.
  • Koziak, Barbara, 1998. “Tragedy, Citizens, and Strangers: The Configuration of Aristotelian Political Emotion,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1983. “Woman is Not a Rational Animal: On Aristotle's Biology of Reproduction,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Matthews, Gareth B., 1986. “Gender and Essence in Aristotle,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Supp., 64: 16–25.
  • Merleau, Chloe Taylor, 2003. “Bodies, Genders, and Causation in Aristotle's Biological and Political Theory,” in Ancient Philosophy, 23(1): 125–151.
  • Modrak, Deborah K. W., 1998. “Aristotle's Theory of Knowledge and Feminist Epistemology,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Modrak, Deborah, 1994. “Aristotle: Women, Deliberation, and Nature,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Morsink, Johannes, 1979. “Was Aristotle's Biology Sexist?” Journal of the History of Biology, 12(1): 83–112.
  • Mulgan, Richard, 1994. “Aristotle and the Political Role of Women,” History of Political Thought, 15(2): 179–202.
  • Nussbaum, Martha, 1998. “Aristotle, Feminism, and Needs for Functioning,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Poster, Carol, 1998. “(Re) Positioning Pedagogy: A Feminist Historiography of Aristotle's ‘Rhetorica,’” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Reutsche, Laura, 2004. “Virtue and Contingent History: Possibilities for Feminist Epistemology” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(1): 73–101.
  • Rosenberg, Rosalind,1975. “In Search of Woman's Nature, 1850–1920,” Feminist Studies, 3: 141–154.
  • Sakezles, Priscilla K., 1999. “Feminism and Aristotle,” Apeiron, 32(1): 67–74.
  • Schollmeier, Paul, 2003. “Aristotle and Women: Household and Political Roles,” in Polis: The Journal of the Society for the Study of Greek Political Thought, 20(1–2): 22–42.
  • Senack, Christine M., 1994. “Aristotle on the Woman's Soul,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1983. “Aristotle and the Politicization of the Soul,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reide.
  • Stiehm, Judith Hicks, 1983. “The Unit of Political Analysis: Our Aristotelian Hangover,” in Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Sandra Harding and Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.), Dordrecht: Reidel.
  • Thom, P., 1976. “Stiff Cheese For Women,” Philosophical Forum, 8(1): 94–107.
  • Tress, Daryl McGowan, 1992. “The Metaphysical Science of Aristotle's ‘Generation of Animals,’ and It Feminist Critics,” Review of Metaphysics, 46(2): 307–341. Reprinted in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), 1996, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Tuana, Nancy, 1994. “Aristotle and the Politics of Reproduction,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Tumulty, Peter, 1981. “Aristotle, Feminism, and Natural Law Theory,” New Scholars, 55: 450–464.
  • Ward, Julia K., 1996. “Aristotle on Philia: The Beginning of a Feminist Ideal of Friendship,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Whitbeck, Caroline, 1976. “Theories of Sex Difference,” in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Witt, Charlotte, 1998. “Form, Normativity, and Gender in Aristotle: A Feminist Perspective,” in Feminist Interpretations of Aristotle, Cynthia A. Freeland (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • Zack, Naomi, 2001. “Intra-Feminist Criticism and Intellectual Virtue,” in Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy (American Philosophical Association Newsletters), 00(2): 83–84.

Plato

Books

  • Bluestone, Natalie Harris, 1987. Women and the Ideal Society: Plato's Republic and Modern Myths of Gender, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.
  • Buchan, Morag, 1999. Women in Plato's Political Theory, New York: Routledge.
  • Tuana, Nancy (ed.), 1994. Feminist Interpretations of Plato, University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.

Articles

  • Allen, Christine Garside, 1975. “Plato on Women,” Feminist Studies, 2(2–3): 132.
  • Annas, Julia, 1996. “Plato's Republic and Feminism,” Philosophy, 51: 309. Reprinted in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), 1996, New York and London: Routledge.
  • Bluestone, Natalie Harris, 1994. “Why Women Cannot Rule: Sexism in Plato Scholarship,” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 109–130.
  • Bowery, Anne-Marie, 1996. “Diotima Tells a Story: A Narrative Analysis of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Bowery, Anne-Marie, 1995. “Plato Visits Postmodernity,” Southwest Philosophy Review, 11: 135–142.
  • Brown, Wendy, 1988. “ ’Supposing Truth Were a Woman’: Plato's Subversion of Masculine Discourse,” Political Theory, 16: 594–616.
  • Calvert, Brian, 1975. “Plato and the Equality of Women,” Phoenix, 29(3).
  • Canto, Monique, 1994. “The Politics of Women's Bodies: Reflections on Plato,” Arthur Goldhammer (trans.), in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 49–66.
  • Cappelletti, Angel J., 1980.“Sobre El Feminismo De Platon,” Revista de Filosofio (Venezuela), 12: 87–96, (Spanish).
  • Darling, John, 1986. “Are Women Good Enough: Plato's Feminism Re-Examined,” Journal of Philosophy in Education, 20: 123–128.
  • De Pater, W. and W. Van Langendonck, 1989. “Natuurlijkheid Van De Taal En Iconiciteit: Plato En Hedendaagse Taaltheorieen,” Tijdschr Filosof, 51: 256–297. (Dutch/Flemish)
  • Dickason, Anne, 1976. “Anatomy and Destiny: The Role of Biology in Plato's Views of Women,” The Philosophical Forum, V (Fall-Winter 1973–1974). Reprinted in Women and Philosophy: Toward a Theory of Liberation, Carol C. Gould and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), 1976. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.
  • duBois, Page, 1994. “The Platonic Appropriation of Reproduction,” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 139–156.
  • Fortenbaugh, W. W., 1975. “On Plato's Feminism in ‘Republic V,’,” Apeiron, IX(2).
  • Freeman, Barbara, 1988. “(Re)writing Patriarchal Texts: The Symposium,” in Postmodernism and Continental Philosophy, Hugh J. Silverman and Donn Welton (eds.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Gardner, Catherine, 2000. “The Remnants of the Family: The Role of Women and Eugenics in Republic V” in History of Philosophy Quarterly, 17(3): 217–235.
  • Genova, Judith, 1994. “Feminist Dialectics: Plato and Dualism,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Gould, Timothy, 1982. “Intensity and its Audiences: Notes Towards a Feminist Perspective,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 12: 287–302.
  • Hampton, Cynthia, 1994. “Overcoming Dualism: The Importance of the Intermediate in Plato's Philebus,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Hawthorne, Susan, 1994. “Diotima Speaks Through the Body,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On, (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press, 1994.
  • Irigaray, Luce, 1995. “Sorcerer's Love: A Reading of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” Eleanor H. Kuykendall (trans.), in Feminism and Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Jacobs, William, 1978. “Plato on Female Emancipation and the Traditional Family,” Apeiron, 12: 24–31.
  • Joo, Maria, 1996. “The Platonic ‘Eros’ and Its Feminist Interpretations,” Magyar Filozofiai Szemle, 1–2-3: 1–30 (Hungarian).
  • Kofman, Sarah, 2002. “Socrates and his Twins (The Socrates(es) of Plato's Symposium)” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 41–67.
  • Lange, Lynda, 1979. “The Function of Equal Education in Plato's ‘Republic’ and ‘Laws,’” in The Sexism of Social and Political Theory, L. Clark and L. Lange (eds.), Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Lesser, Harry, 1979. “Plato's Feminism,” Philosophy, 54: 113–117.
  • Levin, Susan B., 1996. “Women's Nature and Role in the Ideal Polis: ‘Republic V’ Revisited,” in Feminism and Ancient Philosophy, Julie K. Ward (ed.), New York and London: Routledge.
  • Levin, Susan B., 2000. “Plato's On Women's Nature: Reflections on the Laws” in Ancient Philosophy, 20(1): 81–97.
  • Lovibond, Sabina, 1994. “An Ancient Theory of Gender: Plato and the Pythagorean Table,” in Women in Ancient Societies, Archer, Fischler, and Wyke (eds.), London: Routledge), 88–101.
  • Mansfeld, Jaap, 1987. “Plato Over De Vrouw,” Alg. Ned. Tijdschr Wijs, 79: 199–120, (Dutch/Flemish).
  • Marquez, Alvaro, 1986. “El Tema De Lo Femenino En Platon,” Revista de Filosofio (Venezuela), 9: 33–41, (Spanish).
  • Martin, Jane R, 1977. “Equality and Education in Plato,” in Feminism and Philosophy, M. Vetterling-Braggin, F. A. Elliston, J. English (eds.), Totowa, NJ: Littlefield.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1989. “The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium,” Hypatia, 3: 45–61.
  • Nye, Andrea, 1994. “Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.),University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 197–216.
  • Okin, Susan Moller, 1977. “Philosopher Queens and Private Wives: Plato on Women and the Family,” Philosophy and Public Affairs, 6(Summer).
  • Osborne, Martha Lee, 1975. “Plato's Unchanging View of Woman: A Denial That Anatomy Spells Destiny,” The Philosophical Forum, Summer.
  • Pierce, Christine, 1973. “Equality: ‘Republic V,’” The Monist, 57(January).
  • Pierce, Christine, 1994. “Eros and Epistemology,” in Engendering Origins, Bat-Ami Bar On (ed.), Albany: SUNY Press.
  • Pomeroy, Sarah, 1974. “Feminism in Book V of Plato's ‘Republic,’” Apeiron, VIII(1).
  • Santas, Gerasimos, 2005. “Justice, Law, and Women in Plato's Republic” in Philosophical Inquiry: International Quarterly, 27(1–2): 25–37.
  • Saxenhouse, Arlene W., 1984. “Eros and the Female in Greek Political Thought: An Interpretation of Plato's ‘Symposium,’” Political Theory, 12: 5–27.
  • Saxenhouse, Arlene W., 1976. “The Philosopher and the Female in the Political Thought of Plato,” Political Theory, 4(May): 195–212.
  • Senter, Nell W., 1977. “Plato on Women,” Southwest Philosophical Studies, 2: 4–13.
  • Smith, Janet Farrell, 1983. “Plato, Irony and Equality,” Hypatia, WSIF 1: 597–607.
  • Smith, Nicholas, 1980. “The Logic of Plato's Feminism,” Journal of Social Philosophy, 11: 5–11.
  • Spelman, Elizabeth V., 1994. “Hairy Cobblers and Philosopher-Queens” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 87–108.
  • Tress, Daryl McGowan, 1994. “Relations in Plato's ‘Timaeus,’” Journal of Neoplatonic Studies, 3: 93–139.
  • Tuana, Nancy and William Cowling, 1994. “The Presence and Absence of the Feminine in Plato's Philosophy” in Feminist Interpretations of Plato, Nancy Tuana (ed)., University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 243–269.
  • Vlastos, Gregory, 1989. “Was Plato a Feminist?” Times Literary Supplement, 276: 288–289. Cited from Studies in Greek Philosophy, ed. Daniel W. Graham, 1995. Volume 2: Socrates, Plato, and Their Tradition, Princeton: Princeton University Press), 133–143.
  • Wender, Dorothea, 1973. “Plato: Misogynist, Paedophile and Feminist,” Arethusa, VI (Spring).

St. Paul

  • Dubarle, A. M., 1976. “Paul et L'Antifeminisme,” Revue des Sciences Philosophiques et Theologiques, 60: 261–280 (French).

Medieval Philosophy

General

Books

  • Allen, P., 2002–2005. The Concept of Woman: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500, parts 1–2 (Vols. 2–3), William B. Eerdmans Publishing. [Discusses the concept of women in the writings of philosophers of the time]
  • Bennett, J. M. and Karras, R. M. (eds.), 2013. The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Benson, P. J. and Kirkham, V. (eds.), 2005. Strong voices, weak history: early women writers & canons in England, France, & Italy, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. [Includes Isotta Nogarola and Christine de Pizan, among others.]
  • Borresen, Kari Elisabeth (ed.), 1991. Images of God and Gender Models: in Judaeo-Christian Tradition, Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.
  • Brabant, Margaret (ed.), 1992. Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Bynum, C. W., 2013. Resurrection of the Body, New York: Columbia University Press. [Includes extensive sections on Herrad of Hohenbourg and Hildegard von Bingen]
  • Dinshaw, C. and Wallace, D. (eds.), 2003. The Cambridge companion to medieval women's writing, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [Includes Christine de Pizan and Julian of Norwich, among others.]
  • Gracia, J. J. & Noone, T. B. (eds.), 2008. A companion to philosophy in the Middle Ages, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. [Includes Hildegard of Bingen, among others]
  • Griffiths, F. J., 2011. The garden of delights: reform and renaissance for women in the twelfth century, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press. [Includes Hildegard von Bingen]
  • Minnis, A. J. and Voaden, R. (eds.), 2010. Medieval Holy Women in the Christian Tradition, C. 1100-c. 1500, Belgium: Brepols Publishing.
  • Niebrzydowski, S. (ed.), 2011. Middle-aged Women in the Middle Ages (Vol. 7 in the Gender in the Middle Ages Series), Cambridge: DS Brewer.
  • Suydam, Mary A. and Joanne E. Zeigler, 1999. Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality, New York: St. Martin's Press.

Articles

  • Green, Karen, 1994. “Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes,” Philosophical Quarterly, 44(177): 456–475.
  • Hollywood, Amy M., 1994. “Beauvoir, Irigaray, and the Mystical,” Hypatia, 9(4): 158–185.
  • John, Helen J., 1992. “Hildegard of Bingen: A New Medieval Philosopher?” Hypatia, 7(1): 115–123.
  • King, M. L., 2005. “Petrarch, the self-conscious self, and the first women humanists,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 35(3): 537–558.
  • McLaughlin, Eleanor, 1974. “Equality of Souls, Inequality of Sexes: Women in Medieval Theology,” in Religion and Sexism, Rosemary Ruether (ed.), New York: Simon & Schuster.
  • Ruether, Rosemary, 1974. “Misogynism and Virginal Feminism in the Fathers of the Church,” in Religion and Sexism, Rosemary Ruether (ed.), New York: Simon & Schuster.

Akka Mahadevi (Akkamahadevi)

Books

  • Prackash, Shiva, 2010. Songs for Siva: Vacanas of Akka Mahadevi (Sacred Literature Trust Series), Vinaya Chaitanya (trans.), Connecticut: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Narayanan, Vasudha, 2005. “Gender and Priesthood in the Hindu Traditions,” Journal of Hindu-Christian Studies, 18(8).
  • Mudaliar, C. Y., 1991. “Religious Experiences of Hindu Women: A study of Akka Mahadevi,” Mystics Quarterly, 17(3): 137–146.

St. Thomas Aquinas

Books

  • Traina, Cristina L. H., 1999. Feminist Ethics and Natural Law: The End of the Anathemas, Washington DC: Georgetown University Press.

Articles

  • Hartel, Joseph, 1996. “The Integral Feminism of St. Thomas Aquinas,” Gregorianum, 77(3): 527–547.
  • Hein, Hilde, 1989. “Liberating Philosophy: An End to the Dichotomy of Spirit and Matter,” in Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, Ann Garry and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Boston: Unwin Hyman.
  • Lavaud, B., 1940. “Toward a Theology of Woman,” Thomist, 2: 459–518.
  • Snow, Nancy, 2003. “Feminism and Natural Law Theory: Irreconcilable Differences?” in Vera Lex, 4(1–2): 5–21.

St. Augustine

Articles

  • Borresen, Kari Elisabeth, 1994. “Patristic ‘Feminism’: The Case of Augustine,” Augustinian Studies, 25: 139–152.
  • Duval, Shannon, 1993. “Augustine's Radiant Confessional--Theatre of Prophecy,” Contemporary Philosophy, 15(2): 1–4.

The Beguines, including Marguierite Porete and Mechthild of Magdeburg

Books

  • Field, S. L., 2012. The Beguine, the Angel, and the Inquisitor: The Trials of Marguerite Porete and Guiard of Cressonessart, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
  • McDonnell, E.W., 1954. The Beguines and Beghards in Medieval Culture: With Special Emphasis on the Belgian Scene, New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.
  • Mechthild of Magdeburg, 1998. The flowing light of the Godhead, F. J. Tobin (ed. and trans.), Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press.
  • Murk-Jansen, S., 2004. Brides in the Desert: the spirituality of the Beguines, Eugene, Oregon: Wipf and Stock Publishers.
  • Porete, Marguierite, 1993. The mirror of simple souls, Ellen Babinsky (trans.), Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press.
  • Simons, Walter, 2001. Cities of Ladies: Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200–1565, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 978–0-8122–1853–4.

Articles

  • Marin, J., 2010. “Annihilation and Deification in Beguine Theology and Marguerite Porete's Mirror of Simple Souls,” Harvard Theological Review, 103: 89–109. [Discusses moral duty.]
  • Neel, C., 1989. “The origins of the beguines,” Signs, 14: 321–341.

Hildegard von Bingen

Books

  • von Bingen, Hildegard, 2005. Hildegard von Bingen: Selected Writings, Mark Atherton (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Flanagan, S., 2002. Hildegard of Bingen: A visionary life, London: Routledge.
  • Newman, B., 1989. Sister of Wisdom: St. Hildegard's Theology of the Feminine, With a New Preface, Bibliography, and Discography, Oakland: University of California Press.

Articles

  • Corrigan, V. J., 2012. “Hildegard of Bingen,” Icons of the Middle Ages: Rulers, Writers, Rebels, and Saints, Vol 1, Greenword Publishing: 355.
  • Milem, B., 2002. “Hildegard of Bingen,” A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Jorge JE Gracia and Timothy B Noone (eds.), Wiley-Blackwell: 318–319.

Heloise

Books

  • Hamilton, Elizabeth, 1966. Heloise, London: Hodder and Stoughton.
  • Radice, Betty, 1974. The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, Middlesex: Penguin Books.

Herrad of Hohenbourg

Books

  • Gibson, J., 1989. Herrad of Hohenbourg, Springer Netherlands.

Articles

  • Gibson, J., 1991. “Herrad of Hohenbourg,” in A History of Women Philosophers, vol 2, Mary Ellen Waithe (ed.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Gertrude the Great

Books

  • St Gertrude the Great and the Religious of her Monastery, 2002. Life and Revelations of Saint Gertrude the Great, Charlotte, North Carolina: TAN Books.

Julian of Norwich

Books

  • Julian of Norwich, 1999. Revelations of Divine Love (Short Text and Long Text), Elizabeth Spearing (trans.), Penguin Books.
  • Turner, Denys, 2013. Julian of Norwich: Theologian, New Haven/London: Yale University Press.

Articles

  • Adams, Marilyn, 2011. “Julian of Norwich: Problems of Evil and the Seriousness of Sin,” Philosophia, 39(3): 433–447.
  • Bauerschmidt, Frederick Christian, 1997. “Julian of Norwich-Incorporated,” Modern Theology, 13(1): 75–100.
  • Hartmann, J., 1962. “The Revelations of Divine Love of Julian of Norwich,” Augustinianum, 2(2): 446–447.
  • Hide, Kerrie, 2000. “As verily as God is our Father as verily God is our Mother: the doctrine of the Fatherhood and Motherhood of God in the Showings of Julian of Norwich,” Australasian Catholic Record, 77(3): 259–268.
  • Johnson, Lynn Staley, 1991. “The trope of the scribe and the question of literary authority in the works of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe,” Speculum, 66(4): 820–838.
  • Logarbo, Mona, 1986. “Salvation Theology in Julian of Norwich,” Thought, 61(3): 370–380.
  • Park, M. L. Del Mastro, 1989. “Julian of Norwich,” Thought, 64(4): 415–416.
  • Turner, Denys, 2004. “'Sin is behovely' in Julian of norwich's revelations of divine love 1,” Modern Theology, 20(3): 407–422.
  • Watson, Nicholas, 1993. “The Composition of Julian of Norwich's Revelation of Love,” Speculum, 68(3): 637–683.

Christine de Pizan

Books

  • Altmann, B. K., and McGrady, D. L. (eds.), 2003. Christine de Pizan: a casebook, Vol. 34, Hove, UK: Psychology Press.
  • Bell, S. G., 2004. The lost tapestries of the City of ladies: Christine de Pizan's Renaissance legacy, California: University of California Press.
  • Birk, B. A., 2004. Christine de Pizan and biblical Wisdom: A feminist-theological point of view (Marquette Studies in Theology, 47), Milwaukee: Marquette University Press.
  • Brabant, Margaret (ed.), 1992. Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan, Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Desmond, M., 1998. Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference, University of Minnesota Press.
  • de Pizan, Christine, 1997. The selected writings of Christine de Pizan: new translations, criticism, Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski (trans. and ed.) and Kevin Brownlee (ed.), New York: WW Norton & Company.
  • de Pizan, Christine, 1999 [1405]. The Book of the City of Ladies, Rosalind Brown-Grant (trans.), London: Penguin.
  • Forhan, K. L., 2002. The political theory of Christine de Pizan, Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Zimmermann, M. & De Rentiis, D. (eds.), 1994. The city of scholars: new approaches to Christine de Pizan, Walter de Gruyter Inc.

Articles

  • Bell, S. G., 1976. “Christine de Pizan (1364–1430): Humanism and the Problem of a Studious Woman,” Feminist Studies, 3(3/4): 173–184.
  • Berges, Sandrine, 2013. “Teaching Christine de Pizan in Turkey,” Gender and Education, 25(5):595–605.
  • Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate, 2000. “Saintly Scenarios in Christine de Pizan's Livre des trios vertus,” Mediaeval Studies, 62(1): 255–292.
  • Bornstein, Diane, 1977. “French Influence on Fifteenth-Century English Prose as Exemplified by the Translation of Christine de Pisan's Livre du corps de policie,” Mediaeval Studies, 39(1): 369–386.
  • Dudash, Susan J., 2003. “Christine de Pizan and the 'menu peuple',” Speculum, 78(3): 788–831.
  • Margolis, Nadia, 1996. “The Cry of the Chameleon: Evolving Voices in the Epistles of Christine de Pizan,” Disputatio, 1: 37–70.
  • Margolis, Nadia, 1986. “Christine De Pizan: The Poetess as Historian,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 47(3): 361–375.
  • Martínez, María Lara, 2011. “La emancipación de la mujer en la obra de Christine de Pisan,” Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía, 11: 239–245.
  • Green, Karen, 1994. “Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes,” Philosophical Quarterly, 44(177): 456–475.
  • Green, Karen, 2010. “What Were the Ladies in the City of Ladies Reading? The Libraries of Christine de Pizan’s Contemporaries,” Medievalia Et Humanistica, 36: 77–100.
  • Green, Karen, 2011. “Isolated individual or member of a Feminine Courtly Community? Christine de Pizan’s milieu,” in Communities of Learning: Networks and the Shaping of Intellectual Identity in Europe 1100–1500, Constant J. Mews & Crossley John (eds.), Belgium: Brepols.
  • Kirshner, Julius, 2012. “Was bartolo da sassoferrato a source for Christine de pizan?” Mediaeval Studies, 74: 263–282.
  • König-Pralong, Catherine, 2012. “Métaphysique, théologie et politique culturelle chez Christine de Pizan,” Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie Und Theologie, 59(2).
  • Paakkinen, Ilse, 2010. “The case of widows : Christine de Pizan on defending the rights of widows,” in The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy, Virpi Mäkinen (ed.), The Philosophical Society of Finland.
  • Primi, Alice, 2011. “Écrits féministes de Christine de Pizan à Simone de Beauvoir, anthologie réunie et présentée par Nicole Pellegrin,” Clio, 2:15–15.

Murasaki Shikibu

Books

  • Kato, Shuichi, 1979. A History of Japanese Literature: The First Thousand Years, David Chibbett (trans.), London: The Macmillan Press.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 2002. The Tale of Genji, Royall Tyler (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 1996. The Diary of Lady Murasaki, R. Bowring (trans.), Penguin Classics.
  • Shikibu, Murasaki, 1982. Murasaki Shikibu, Her Diary and Poetic Memoirs: A Translation and Study, R Bowring (trans.), New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Articles

  • Fujiwara No Teika and Meigetsuki, Nanba Hiroshi (ed.), 1972. “Murasaki Shikibu shu no Kenkyu: Koihen, denpon kenkyuhen,” Kasama Sosho, 31.
  • Miner, Earl, 1982. “The Heroine: Identity, Recurrence, Destiny,” in Ukifune: Love in The Tale of Genji, Andrew Pekarik (ed.), New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Miyamoto, Shoson, 1967. “Relation of Philosophical Theory to Practical Affairs in Japan,” in The Japanese Mind, Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture, Charles A. Moore (ed.), Honolulu: East-West Center Press, University of Hawai‘i Press, 5–6.

Renaissance and Sixteenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Benson, P. J., 2010. Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy and England, Penn State Press.
  • Cohn, S. K., 1996. Women in the streets: essays on sex and power in Renaissance Italy, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Colonna, Vittoria, Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella, 2008. Who is Mary?: Three Early Modern Women on the Idea of the Virgin Mary, Susan Haskins (ed. and trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [Includes Vittoria Colonna, Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella.]
  • Ferguson, M. W., M. Quilligan, and N. J. Vickers, 1986. Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Jacobs, F. H., 1997. Defining the Renaissance virtuosa: women artists and the language of art history and criticism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Jordan, C., 1990. Renaissance Feminism: Literary Texts and Political Models, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Kelly, J., 1984. Women, History and Theory: The Essays of Joan Kelly, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Kuehn, T. 1994. Law, Family, and Women: Toward a Legal Anthropology of Renaissance Italy, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • King, M. L., 1997. Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Medieval & and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 20, Binghamton, New York: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies.
  • King, M. L., 1991. Women of the Renaissance, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Maclean, I., 1980. The Renaissance Notion of Woman: A Study in the Fortunes of Scholasticism and Medical Science in European Intellectual Life, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Richardson, Lula McDowell, 1928. The Forerunners of Feminism in French Literature of the Renaissance: From Christine of Pisa to Marie de Gournay, Johns Hopkins studies in Romance Literatures and Languages, 12, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Ross, S. G., 2009, The Birth of Feminism: Woman as Intellect in Renaissance Italy and England, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. [Sections are organized by topic, not women. Focus is on 19 women writers from 1400–1700, including interesting discussions about “the intellectual family”. Includes Marinella and Isotta Nogarola.]

Articles

  • Banic-Pajnic, Erna, 2004. “Women in Renaissance Philosophy,” in Prilozi za Istrazivanje Hrvatske Filozofske Bastine, 59–60(1–2): 69–89 (in Serbo-Croatian).
  • Cox, V., 1995. “The Single Self: Feminist Thought and the Marriage Market in Early Modern Venice,” Renaissance Quarterly, 48(3): 513–81.
  • Curtis-Wendlandt, Lisa, 2004. “Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinita d'Amore,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(4): 77–98.
  • Gibson, Joan, 1989. “Educating for Silence: Renaissance Women and the Language Arts,” Hypatia, 4: 9–27.
  • Hurlburt, H. S., 2007. “A Renaissance for Renaissance Women?” Journal of Women's History, 19(2): 193–201.
  • King, M., 1980. “Book-Lined Cells: Women and Humanism in the Early Italian Renaissance,” in Beyond Their Sex: Learned Women of the European Past, P. H. Labalme (ed.), New York and London: New York University Press, 66–90.
  • Zedler, Beatrice H., 1989. “Marie le Jars de Gournay,” in A History of Women Philosophers, Volume II: Medieval, Renaissance and Enlightenment, A. D. 500–1600, Norwell: Kluwer.

Francis Bacon and the Scientific Revolution

Books

  • Merchant, Carolyn, 1980. The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution, San Francisco: Harper & Row.

Articles

  • Keller, Evelyn Fox, 1980. “Baconian Science: A Hermaphroditic Birth,” Philosophical Forum, 11(3): 299–308.
  • Landau, Iddo, 1998. “Feminist Criticisms of Metaphors in Bacon's Philosophy of Science,” in Philosophy: The Journal of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, 73(283): 47–61.
  • Potter, Elizabeth, 1988. “Modeling the Gender Politics in Science,” Hypatia, 3: 19–33.

Laura Cereta

Books

  • Cereta, L., 1997. Collected letters of a Renaissance feminist, Diane Robin (ed.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Gill, A. M., 2009. “Fraught Relations in the Letters of Laura Cereta: Marriage, Friendship, and Humanist Epistolarity,” Renaissance Quarterly, 62(4): 1098–1129.
  • Rabil, A., 1981. “Laura Cereta: Quattrocento Humanist,” Renaissance Quarterly, 36(2): 231–33.

Cassandra Fedele

Books

  • Fedele, C., 2007. Letters and orations, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Mayer, T. F. and Woolf, D. R., 1995. The rhetorics of life-writing in early modern Europe: forms of biography from Cassandra Fedele to Louis XIV, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Articles

  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration for Bertucio Lamberto, Receiving the Honors of the Liberal Arts,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 69–73.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Letters: (a) Alessandra Scala to Cassandra; (b) Cassandra to Alessandra,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 87–88.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration in praise of letters,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 74–77.
  • Fedele, C., 1983. “Cassandra Fedele: Oration to the Ruler of Venice, Francesco Venerio, on the arrival of the Queen of Poland,” in Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. (trans. and eds.), Binghamton, N.Y.: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1983, 48–50.
  • Ross, S. G., 2007. “Her Father's Daughter: Cassandra Fedele, Woman Humanist of the Venetian Republic,” in COLLeGIUM: Studies Across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Volume 2: The Trouble with Ribs: Women, Men and Gender in Early Modern Europe, Anu Korhonen and Kate Lowe (eds.).

Veronica Gambara

Books

  • Gambara, V., 2012[1759]. Rime E Lettere Di Veronica Gambara, Nabu Press.
  • Gambara, V., 1890. Sonetti amorosi inediti o rari, L. Battei.
  • Gambara, V., 1995. Le rime, Alan Bullock (ed.), Firenze: Leo S. Olschki.

Articles

  • Bozzetti, C., P. Gibellini & E. Sandal (eds.), 1989. Veronica Gambara e la poesia del suo tempo nell'Italia settentrionale: atti del convegno, Brescia-Correggio 17–19 ottobre 1985, Olschki.

Lucrezia Marinella

Books

  • Benson, P. J., 1992. The Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy and England, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Colonna, V., Chiara Matraini, and Lucrezia Marinella, 2008. Who is Mary?: Three early modern women on the idea of the Virgin Mary,Susan Haskins (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Marinella, L., 1999. The Nobility and Excellence of Women, and the Defects and Vices of Men, Anne Dunhill (trans.), Chicago: Chicago University Press.
  • Marinella, L., 2009. Enrico; or, Byzantium Conquered: A Heroic Poem, Maria Galli Stampino (trans.), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles

  • Chemello, A, 2000. “The rhetoric of eulogy in Marinella's La nobiltà e l'eccelenza delle donne,” in Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society, Panniza, L. (ed.), London: Legenda, 463–77.
  • Kraye, J., 1994. “The Transformation of Plato in the Renaissance,” in Platonism and the English Imagination, A. Baldwin and S. Hutton (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kolsky, S., 2001. “Moderata Fonte, Lucrezia Marinella, Guiseppe Passi: An Early Seventeenth-Century Feminist controversy,” The Modern Language Review, 96(4): 973–89.
  • Malpezzi Price, P. and C. Ristaino, 2008. “Lucrezia Marinella and the 'Querelle des Femmes',” in Seventeenth-Century Italy, Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Isotta Nogarola

Books

  • Nogarola, Isotta, 2003. Complete Writings: Letter book, Dialogue on Adam and Eve, Orations, Margaret L. King and Diana Robin (eds. and trans.), Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Articles

  • Jardine, Lisa, 1983. “Isotta Nogarola: Women humanists‐Education for what?” History of Education, 12(4): 231–144.
  • King, M. L., 1978. “The Religious Retreat of Isotta Nogarola (1418–1466): Sexism and Its Consequences in the Fifteenth Century,” Signs, 3(4): 807–822.
  • Parker, Holt, 2002. “Angela Nogarola (ca. 1400) and Isotta Nogarola (1418–1466): Thieves of Language,” in Women Writing Latin: From Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe, Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey (eds.), New York: Routledge, 11–30.

Oliva Sabuco

Books

  • Oliva Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, 2010. The True Medicine, Gianna Pomata (ed. and trans.), Toronto: Iter.
  • Oliva Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, 2007. New Philosophy of Human Nature: Neither Known to nor Attained by the Great Ancient Philosophers, Which Will Improve Human Life and Health, Mary Ellen Waithe, Maria Colomer Vintro, and C. Angel Zorita (eds. and trans.), Illinois: University of Illinois Press.

Seventeenth Century Philosophy

General

Books

  • Atherton, Margaret (ed.), 1994. Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, Indianapolis: Hackett.
  • Boros, Gábor, Herman De Dijn, and Martin Moors (eds.), 2007. The concept of love in 17th and 18th century philosophy, Leuven University Press. [Includes a chapter on the Masam-Astell exchange. Also included in the 18th Century Philosophers Section]
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2002. Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [Focuses on Elizabeth of Bohemia, Cavendish, Conway, Astell, Masham, Cockburn]
  • Conley, John J., 2002. The Suspicion of Virtue: Women Philosophers in Neoclassical France, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. [Includes Madame de Sablé, Madame Deshoulières, Madame de la Sabliére, Mlle de la Vallière, and Madame de Maintenon]
  • Courtney, William Leonard, 1888. Studies new and old, London: Chapman and Hall. [Includes an entire chapter dedicated to Jacqueline. Also includes a chapter on Princess Elisabeth and Descartes.]
  • Craveri, Benedetta and Teresa Waugh, 2005. The Age of Conversation, New York: New York Review Books. [Includes chapters dedicated to de Sable, de la Sabliere, de Maintenon, and others. Spans 17th and 18th Centuries.]
  • Fara, P, 2004. Pandora's breeches: Women, science and power in the enlightenment, London: Random House. [Sections dedicated to Elisabeth/Descartes, Conway/Leibniz, Chatelet/Newton, among others. Spans 17th and 18th Centuries]
  • Pal, Carol, 2012. Republic of Women: Rethinking the Republic of Letters in the Seventeenth Century, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. [Includes chapters on Elisabeth of Bohemia, Anna Maria van Schurman, Dorothy Moore, Katherine Jones, and Bathsua Makin.]
  • Smith, Hilda L., 1982. Reason's Disciples: Seventeenth-Century English Feminists, Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Articles

  • Deckard, Michael Funk, 2012. “Acts of Admiration: Wondrous Women in Early Modern Philosophy,” Journal of Early Modern Studies, 1(1). [Elisabeth, Anne Finch/Conway,Mary Astell, and others]
  • Findlen, Paula, 2002. “Ideas in the Mind: Gender and Knowledge in the Seventeenth Century,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 17(1): 183–196.
  • Ganim, Russell, 1996. “Scientific Verses: Subversion of Cartesian Theory and Practice in the ‘Discours à Madame de la Sablière’,” in Refiguring La Fontaine: Tercentenary Essays, Anne Birberick (ed.), Charlottesville, VA: Rookwood, 101–125.
  • James, Susan, 2002. “The Passions and Philosophy,” in Feminism and History of Philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd (ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, 131–159.
  • Lascano, Marcy, forthcoming. “Early Modern Women on the Cosmological Argument: A Case Study in Feminist History of Philosophy,” in Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women's Philosophical Thought, E. O'Neill and M. Lascano (eds.), Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Ogilvie-Bailey, Marilyn, 1986. “La Sablière, Marguerite Hessein de la,” in Women in Science: Antiquity through the Nineteenth Century, Cambridge: MIT Press, 118–119.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 1998. “Disappearing Ink: Early Modern Philosophers and Their Fate in History,” in Philosophy in a Feminist Voice, Janet Kourany (ed.), Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 1999. “Women Cartesians, ‘Feminine Philosophy,’ and Historical Exclusion,” in Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes, Susan Bordo (ed.), University Park: Pennsylvania University Press.
  • O'Neill, Eileen, 2005. “Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy,” in Hypatia, 20(3): 185–197 Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811122 [Interesting overview that orients many of the women on the list into a conceptual map.]
  • Pateman, Carole, 1988. “Patriarchal Confusions,” International Journal of Moral and Social Studies, 3: 127–143.
  • Rogers, G.A.J., 2004. “Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century,” in Philosophical Books, 45(4): 335–339.
  • Shanley, Mary Lyndon, 1982. “Marriage Contract and Social Contract in Seventeenth Century English Political Thought,” in The Family in Political Thought, Jean Bethke Elshtain (ed.), Brighton: Harvester Press.
  • Shapiro, Lisa, 2004. “Some Thoughts on the Place of Women in Early Modern Philosophy,” in Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy, L. Alanen and C. Witt (eds.), Klewer Academic Publishing, 219–250.
  • Zedler, Beatrice H., 1989. “The three princesses,” Hypatia, 4(1): 28–63.

Mary Astell

Books

  • Astell, Mary, 1996. Astell: Political Writings, P. Springborg (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Astell, Mary, 2002. A Serious Proposal to the Ladies, Parts I and II, P. Springborg (ed.), Ontario: Broadview Literary Texts.
  • Kolbrener, William and Michal Michelson (eds.), 2007. Mary Astell: Reason, Gender, Faith, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishers. [Includes 13 essays on Astell.]
  • Perry, Ruth, 1990. The Celebrated Mary Astell, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Sowaal, Alice and Penny Weiss, (forthcoming). Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell, Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Springborg, Patricia, 2005. Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom from Domination, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sutherland, Christine, 2005. The Eloquence of Mary Astell, University of Calgary Press.

Articles

  • Apetrei, Sarah, 2008. “Call No Man Master Upon Earth: Mary Astell's Tory Feminism and an Unknown Correspondence,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 41(4): 507–523.
  • Alvarez, David P., 2011. “Reason and Religious Tolerance: Mary Astell’s Critique of Shaftesbury,” Eighteenth-Century Studies, 44(4): 475–494.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2003. “Adversaries or Allies? Occasional Thoughts on the Masham-Astell Exchange,” Eighteenth-Century Thought, 1: 123–49. [Also listed under Masham]
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2009. “Mary Astell on Virtuous Friendship,” Parergon, 26(2): 65–86.
  • Bryson, Cynthia B., 1998. “Mary Astell: Defender of the ‘Disembodied Mind,’” Hypatia, 13(4): 40–62.
  • Ellenzweig, Sarah, 2003. “The love of God and the radical enlightenment: Mary Astell's brush with Spinoza”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 64(3): 379–397.
  • Green, Karen, 2012. “When is a Contract Theorist Not A Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catherine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes,” in Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes, Nancy J.Hiaschmann and Joanne H. Wright (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press. pp 169–189. [Also listed under Catherine Macaulay]
  • Lascano, Marcy P. (forthcoming). “Mary Astell on the Existence and Nature of God,” In Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell, Alice Sowaal and Penny Weiss (eds.), University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Lister, Andrew, 2004. “Marriage and Misogyny: The Place of Mary Astell in the History of Political Thought,” in History of Political Thought, 25(10): 44–72.
  • McCrystal, John, 1993. “Revolting Women: The Use of Revolutionary Discourse in Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared,” History of Political Thought, 14(2): 189–203.
  • Myers, Joanne E., 2013. “Enthusiastic Improvement: Mary Astell and Damaris Masham on Sociability,” Hypatia, 28(3): 533–550. [Also listed under Lady Masham]
  • Nelson, A., 2005. “The Rationalist Impulse,” in A Companion to Rationalism, A. Nelson (ed.), Malden, MA: Blackwell, pp. 3–11.
  • Sowaal, Alice, 2007. “Mary Astell's Serious Proposal: Mind, Method, and Custom,” Philosophy Compass, 2(2): 227–43.
  • Taylor, E. Derek, 2001. “Mary Astell's Ironic Assault on John Locke's Theory of Thinking Matter,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 62/(3): 505–522.
  • Weiss, Penny A., 2004. “Mary Astell: Including Women's Voices in Political Theory,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 19(3): 63–84.
  • Wilson, Catherine, 2004.“Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 21 (3): 281–98. [Also listed under Lady Masham]

Aphra Behn

Books

  • Behn, Aphra, 2009. Oroonoko and Other Writings, Oxford University Press.
  • Hughes, Derek, and Janet Todd (eds.), 2004. The Cambridge Companion to Aphra Behn, Cambridge University Press.
  • Hutner, Heidi (ed.), 1993. Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, and Criticism, University of Virginia Press.
  • Kreis-Schinck, Annette, 2001. Women, Writing, and the Theater in the Early Modern Period: The Plays of Aphra Behn and Susanne [ie Susanna] Centlivre, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press.
  • O’Donnell, Mary Ann, 2004. Aphra Behn: an annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources, Ashgate Publishing.
  • Spender, D., 1982. Women of Ideas and What Men Have Done to Them: From Aphra Behn to Adrienne Rich, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  • Wallace, David, 2008. Premodern Places: Calais to Surinam, Chaucer to Aphra Behn, John Wiley & Sons.

Articles

  • Dickson, Vernon Guy, 2007. “Truth, Wonder, and Exemplarity in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 47(3): 573–594.
  • Finger, Stanley, 2012. “The Lady and the Eel: how Aphra Behn introduced Europeans to the 'numb eel',” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 55(3):378–401.
  • Harol, Corrinne, 2012. “The Passion of Oroonoko: Passive Obedience, The Royal Slave, and Aphra Behn's Baroque Realism,” ELH, 79(2): 447–475.
  • Hughes, Derek, 2002. “Race, Gender, and Scholarly Practice: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” Essays in Criticism, 52(1): 1–22.
  • Molineux, Catherine, 2013. “False Gifts/Exotic Fictions: Epistemologies of Sovereignty and Assent in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko,” ELH, 80(2): 455–488.
  • Orr, Leah, 2013. “Attribution Problems in the Fiction of Aphra Behn,” Modern Language Review, 108(1): 30–51.
  • Pearson, Jacqueline, 1991. “Gender and Narrative in the Fiction of Aphra Behn,” The Review of English Studies, 42(165): 40–56.

Caroline of Ansbach

Articles

  • Brown, Gregory, 2004. “Personal, Political, and Philosophical Dimensions of the Leibniz-Caroline Correspondence,” in Leibniz and His Correspondents, Paul Lodge (ed.), Cambridge University Press. Retrived from http://www.myilibrary.com/?ID=47793
  • Meli, Bertoloni D, 1999. “Caroline, Liebniz, and Clarke,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 60(3): 469–486, University of Pennsylvania Press. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/stable/3654014

Margaret Cavendish

Books

  • Battigelli, Anna, 1998. Margaret Cavendish and The Exiles of the Mind, Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 2001. Observations on the Experimental Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill (ed.), New York/Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 1992. Description of a new world, called the Blazing World, and other writings, Kate Lilley (ed.), New York: NYU Press.
  • Cavendish, Margaret, 2000. Paper Bodies, A Margaret Cavendish Reader, Sylvia Bowerblank and Sara Mendelson (eds.), Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press.
  • Cottegnies, Line, and Nancy Weitz (eds.), 2003. Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, Fairleigh Dickinson.
  • Clucas, Stephen (ed.), 2003. A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Hampshire (England) and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company.
  • James, Susan (ed.), Margaret Cavendish: Political Writings, Cambridge University Press.
  • O’Neill, Eileen, 2001. “Introduction.” in Margaret Cavendish: Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, Eileen O’Neill (ed.), Cambridge/NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rees, Emma LE, 2003. Margaret Cavendish, Manchester University Press.
  • Sarasohn, Lisa T, 2010. The Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish: Reason and Fancy During the Scientific Revolution, Vol 2 , John Hopkins University Press.
  • Spalding-Andréolle, Donna and Véronique Molinari (eds.), 2011, Women and Science, 17th Century to Present: Pioneers, Activists and Protagonists, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars. [Chapter 2 is on d’Arconville, chapter 1 is on Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway]
  • Whitaker, Katie, 2002. Mad Madge: The Extraordinary Life of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, the First Woman to Live by Her Pen, New York: Basic Books.

Articles

  • Bonin, Erin Lang, 2000. “Margaret Cavendish's Dramatic Utopias and the Politics of Gender,” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 40(2): 339–354.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2006. “Fame, Virtue, and Government: Margaret Cavendish on Ethics and Politics,” Journal of the History of Ideas, 67(2): 251–289.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2013. “Margaret Cavendish,” Philosophers' Magazine, 60 (1):63 - 65.
  • Boyle, Deborah, 2013. “Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom,” Hypatia, 28(3):516–532.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2007. “Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion and Witchcraft,” Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, 38: 493–505.
  • Broad, Jacqueline, 2011. “Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today?” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A, 42(3):457–461.
  • Clucas, Stephen, 1994. “The Atomism of the Cavendish Circle: A Reappraisal,” The Seventeenth Century, 9: 247–273.
  • Clucas, Stephen, 2000. “The Duchess and Viscountess: Negotiations between Mechanism and Vitalism in the Natural Philosophies of Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway,” In-Between: Essays and Studies in Literary Criticism, 9(1): 125–36. [also listed under Anne Conway]
  • Clucas, Stephen, 2003. “Variation, Irregularity and Probabilism: Margaret Cavendish and Natural Philosophy as Rhetoric,” in A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, Stephen Clucas (ed.), Hampshire (England) and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, 199–209.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2006. “Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish,” in Daniel Garber and Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, 3: 199–240.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2007. “Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature,” Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie, 89: 157–81.
  • Detlefsen, Karen, 2009. “Margaret Cavendish on the Relation between God and World,” Philosophy Compass, 4(3): 421–438.
  • Duncan, Stewart, 2012. “Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More,” History of Philosophy Quarterly, 29(4):391–409.
  • Gregoriou, Zelia, 2013. “Pedagogy and Passages: The Performativity of Margaret Cavendish's Utopian Fiction,” Journal of Philosophy of Education.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1996. “In Dialogue with Thomas Hobbes: Margaret Cavendish’s Natural Philosophy,” Women’s Writing, 4: 421–32.
  • Hutton, Sarah, 1997. “Anne Conway, Margaret Cavendish and Seventeenth-Century Scientific Thought,” in Women, Science, and Medicine 1500–1700, L. Hunter and S. Hutton (eds.), Stroud/Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing. [Also listed under Anne Conway].
  • Hutton, Sarah, 2003. “Science and Satire: the Lucianic Voice of Margaret Cavendish’s Description of a New World Called the Blazing World,” In Authorial Conquests: Essays on Genre in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, Line Cottegnies and Nancy Weitz (eds.), Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses.
  • Ingram, Randall, 2000. “First Words and Second Thoughts: Margaret Cavendish, Humphrey Moseley, and 'the Book',” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 30(1): 101–124.
  • James, Susan, 1999. “The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish,” British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 7(2):219–244.
  • Lewis, Eric, 2001. “The Legacy of Margaret Cavendish,” Perspectives on Science, 9(3): 341–365.
  • Michaelian, Kourken, 2009. “Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology,”

During his career, Dr. Vlastos wrote several texts and edited more than 50 books. He served as president of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association. Among his numerous awards and honors, he won two Guggenheim fellowships and was awarded the MacArthur Foundation fellowship in 1990.

He was born in Istanbul, known then as Constantinople, where his family belonged to a small sect of Greek Protestants. He earned his undergraduate degree at the American-run Robert College in Istanbul. At the age of 18 he came to the United States to study.

At the Chicago Theological Seminary, he earned a doctorate of divinity and was ordained as a Congregational minister, although he never became a pastor. Then he went to Harvard University to obtain a doctorate in philosophy.

Dr. Vlastos taught at Queen's College in Kingston, Ontario, from 1931 to 1948, when he went to Cornell. After seven years there, he went to Princeton University, where he became chairman of the philosophy department and played a leading role in campus governance. Upon retiring from Princeton in 1976, he moved to Berkeley and taught there part time for more than a decade.

In his personal views, Dr. Vlastos was outspoken for social change and progressive causes, including opposition to the Vietnam War and support of feminism.

He is survived by a son, Stephen, of Iowa City, a daughter, Mari, of Berkeley, and a brother, Kimon, of Athens, Greece.

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