When The Cat Away The Mice Will Play Essay

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A proverb is a pithy expression stating wisdom believed to be true by the majority of the population. Contrary to a saying, the proverb is always phrased the same way.

A[edit]

  • "Wie a zegt moet ook b zeggen."
    • English equivalent: In for a penny, in for a pound.
    • Van Dale Groot woordenboek der Nederlandse taal. van Dale. p. 1595. ISBN 90-6648-128-5. 
    • Source for English: Van Dale Handwoordenboek Nederlands Engels. van Dale. p. 988. ISBN 90-6648-207-9. 
  • Aan de vruchten kent men den boom.
    • English equivalent: A tree is known by its fruit.
    • "People judge your character by what you do."
  • Aanval is de beste verdediging.
    • English equivalent: The best defence is a good offence.
    • "You are more likely to win if you take the initiative and make an attack rather than preparing to defend yourself."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 518. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Acht is meer dan duizend.
    • English equivalent: Take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves.
    • "Eight [homonym 'careful attention' and 'eight'] is more than a thousand."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Al draagt een aap een gouden ring, het is en blijft een lelijk ding.
    • English equivalent: A golden bit does not make the horse any better.
    • "To those who are given to virtue, the boast of titles is wholly alien and distasteful."
    • Petrarch, “On the Various Academic Titles,” De remediis utriusque fortunae, C. Rawski, trans. (1967), p. 73
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 53. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Als de kat van huis is, dansen de muizen op tafel.
    • English equivalent: When the cat's away, the mice will play
      • When the 'boss' isn't there, the people make a mess of it.
  • Afwisseling van spijs doet eten.
    • English equivalent: Variety pleases.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Alle waar is naar zijn geld.
    • English equivalent: Everything is worth its price.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 800. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Alles heeft zijn reden.'
    • English equivalent: Every why has a wherefore.
    • "Everything has an underlying reason."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Als de berg niet tot Mohammed wil komen dan moet Mohammed naar de berg gaan.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • "If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Source: Coolen, J.; Steerneman, Pim; Vandormael, Jan (2004). Kind in de knel: ontwikkelingsstoornissen in de praktijk van de jeugdzorg: samen-werken. Garant. p. 99. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Als je hem een vinger geeft, neemt hij de hele hand.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch he will take a yard.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 228. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Als elk voor zijn huis veegt, zo worden alle straten schoon.
    • English equivalent: Everyone should sweep before his own door.
    • "If you can't even clean up your own room, who the hell are you to give advice to the world?"
    • Jordan Peterson, Message to Milennials: How to Change the World – Properly (2016)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 28. 
  • De ratten verlaten het zinkende schip.
    • English equivalent: Rats desert a sinking ship.
    • A leader or organization in trouble will quickly be abandoned.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1150. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Van Dale Groot woordenboek der Nederlnadse taal. van Dale. p. 1041. ISBN 90-6648-128-5. 
  • Alles komt op zijn tijd.
    • English equivalent. He that can have patience can have what he will; Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502. 

B[edit]

  • Beter alleen, dan in kwaad gezelschap.
    • It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 162. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Beter één vogel in de hand dan tien in de lucht.
    • Better is one bird in the hand than ten in the air.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • "Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 29 July 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 8. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Beter hard geblazen, dan de mond gebrand.
    • Better to have blown hard, than to have a burned mouth.
    • English equivalent: Better safe than sorry.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Beter voorkomen dan genezen.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 332. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Bezint eer gij begint.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap.
    • "The man who thinks before he acts, is most likely to act with discretion, and have no future cause to repent of his conduct; but he who acts blindly, without any foresight, will probably suffer for his rashness."
    • Trusler, John (1790). Proverbs exemplified, and illustrated by pictures from real life. p. 115. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1069. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Blaffende honden bijten niet.
    • Barking dogs don't bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 0415160502. 

D[edit]

  • De appel valt niet ver van de boom.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • De baard maakt geen wijsgeer; anders was er de bok goed aan.
    • English equivalent: If the beard were all, the goat might preach.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De baas wordt altijdt het slechtst bediend.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De draad breekt daar hij zwakst is.
    • English equivalent: A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
    • "A weak part or member will affect the success or effectiveness of the whole."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 31 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 19. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De duivel heeft het vragen uitgevonden.
    • The devil invented questioning.
    • "A little learning is a dang'rous thing;
      Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring;
      There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
      And drinking largely sobers us again."
    • Alexandre Pope, An Essay on Criticism
    • Laan, Heidt (1979). Nederlandse spreekwoorden/spreuken en zegswijzen. Elsevier. p. 82. 
  • "De eene nagel drift den anderen uit."
    • English equivalent: One nail drives out another.
    • "As one nail drives out another
      , So the remembrance of my former love
      Is by a newer object quite forgotten."
    • William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (1592)
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Taylor & Francis. pp. 648–. ISBN 978-0-415-10381-7. 
  • De eersten zullen de laatsten zijn.
    • English equivalent: The last will be first, and the first last.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1085. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De geschiedenis herhaalt zich.
    • English equivalent: Something that has happened once can happen again.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De gestadige drup holt de steen.
    • English equivalent: A constant drip wears the stone.
    • "A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books."
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De grote vissen eten de kleine.
    • English equivalent: People are like fish; the big ones devour the small.
    • "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1086. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De mens wikt, maar God beschikt.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes but God disposes.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Die mij bemint, bemint ook mijn hond.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De muren hebben oren.
    • English equivalent: walls have ears.
    • "What you say may be overheard; used as a warning."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 287. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 27 September 2013. 
    • Source: Bodegom, Gerda; Donaldson, Bruce (2005). Colloquial Dutch 2: The Next Step In Language Learning. Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415310776. 
  • De rook van het vaderland is aangenamer dan een vreemd vuur.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De toekomst is een boek met zeven sloten.
  • De uitkomst zal het leren.
    • English equivalent: The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
    • "The taste, not the looks, must constitute the criterion. It may be like, many other things, beautiful externally but within devoid of every excellence."
    • William Henry Porter (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 176. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 77. 
  • De uitzondering bevestigt de regel.
    • The exception confirms the rule.
    • Source: Verklarend Handwoordenboek Der Nederlandse Taal. Taylor & Francis. 1971. p. 118. 
  • Des volks stem is Gods stem.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of God.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De waarheid wil niet altijd gezegd zijn.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De weg naar de hel is geplaveid met goede voornemens.
    • The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Die den honing wil uithalen, moet het stijken der bijen ondergaan.
    • English equivalent: Honey is sweet, but the bees sting.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 837. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Die eens steelt is altijd een dief.
    • English equivalent: Before you make a friend eat a bushel of salt with him.
    • "People keep telling us who they are, but we ignore it - because we want them to be who we want them to be."
    • Lisa Albert, Janet Leahy, Matthew Weiner, Mad Men (2010)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 771. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Die goed doet, goed ontmoet.
    • English equivalent: If you do good, good will be done to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Doet naar mijn woorden en niet naar mijn werken.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
    • "It bears no reason that others should show greater love to me, than I have showed them."
    • John Locke, Second Tract of Government (1662)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 706. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Door de bomen het bos niet meer zien.
    • English equivalent: Missing the forest because of the trees.
    • Theissen, S. and P. Hiligsmann (1999). Uitdrukkingen en spreekwoorden van A tot Z: Dictionnaire n√©erlandais-fran√ßais d'expressions et de proverbes Explication, traduction et exercices, De Boeck Universit√©.

E[edit]

  • Een bloode hond word zelden velt.
    • English equivalent: Discretion is the better part of valor.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 130. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een dichter wordt geboren, een redenaar word gemaakt.
    • English equivalent: Poets are born, but orators are trained.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een drenkeling klemt zich aan een strohalm vast.
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gek zegt wel eens een wijs woord..
    • English equivalent: A fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gewaarschuwd mens telt voor twee.
    • A warned man counts as two.
    • English equivalent: Warned is forearmed.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gierigaard is nooit rijk.
    • Covetousness is its own stepmother.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een goede naam is beter dan olie.
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een kat in de zak kopen.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een kroum hout brandt zowel als een recht.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • "One learns taciturnity best among people who have none, and loquacity among the taciturn."
    • Jean Paul Richter, Hesperus, XII.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 70. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een mens zijn zin is een mens zijn leven.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een slecht werksman beschuldigt altijd zijn tuig.
    • A bad craftsman blames his tools.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een spiering uitwerpen, om een kabeljaauw te vangen.
    • To throw a smelt, to catch a codfish.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 16. 
  • Er is niets nieuw onder de zon.
    • English equivalent: There is nothing new under the sun.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Er schuilt een adder in 't gras.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1070. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Er zijn geen ergere blinden dan die niet zien willen.
    • English equivalent: There are none so blind as they who will not see.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 320. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Er zijn geen ergere doven dan die niet horen willen.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1110. ISBN 0415096243. 

G[edit]

  • Ga niet op het uiterlijk af.
    • English equivalent: Never judge by appearances; Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • "No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first."
    • Thomas Carlyle, Essays, "Novalis"
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geeft men hem den duim, dan wil hij er de vingers nog bij hebben.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Geen geld, geen Zwitsers.
    • No money, no Swiss.
    • English equivalent: Nothing for nothing.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 223. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Geduld gaat boven geleerdheid.
    • Patience goes beyond knowledge.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Patience can often do more than your wits.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 415. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geld moet rollen.
    • Money must roll.
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
    • "Wish a miser long life, and you wish him no good."
    • Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack (1738)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1013. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gen haar zoo klein of het heeft ook zijn schaduw.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Every hair casts its shadow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geen regel zonder uitzondering.
    • There exists no rule without exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1174. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geen rook zonder vuur.
    • No smoke without fire.
    • Rumors are always, partially, based on facts.
    • Other meaning: There is a reason behind everything that happens.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 232. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Gemeen gerucht is zelden gelogen.
    • Common rumor seldom lies.
    • English equivalent: Common fame is often to blame.
    • A general disrepute is often true.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 4 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 662. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gemeene plaag rust wel.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 351. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geneesheer, genees u zelven!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal yourself!
    • Don't correct other people's faults; correct your own faults instead.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gezondheid is een grote schat.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • "What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world - and loses his health?"
    • Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geweld is geen recht.
    • English equivalent: Might is not always right.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1090. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • God behoede mij voor mijn vrienden, mijn vijenden neem ik zelf voor mijn rekening.
    • God save me from my friends; my enemies I can handle myself.
    • English equivalent: A mans worst enemies are often those of his own house.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • God schept geen mond, of hij schept er ook brood.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Try not to worry so much about the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Goed begin, goed einde.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending.
    • "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "40". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "190". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Goed verloren, niet verloren; moed verloren, veel verloren; eer verloren, meer verloren; ziel verloren, al verloren.
    • English equivalent: Courage lost, all lost.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs
"A good example will gain much following." The windmill is a symbol of the highly agricultural Netherlands.
"The devil invented questioning."


Being a conscientious finance person, I don’t like doing anything without specific permission. On Thursday 17 August, Mignon was out of the office and I heard that Nandi, Ndibs and Sive were running a Writing Good Essays workshop with learners at Christel House in Ottery. To my delight they said that I could join them – so whilst the cat is away the mice will play! What a wonderful experience – my inaugural in-the-field event, gaining first-hand experience of FunDza in action.

We arrived at the school and found our way to the English classroom where we would be running the workshop. The Head of the English Department introduced us and then he and the English teacher left the class in our hands. The class was set out in groups of learners at different tables. Nandi and Ndibs shared the teaching work between them while our new intern Sive was in charge of videoing the workshop. The learners were each given a FunDza book to write in and told that the class as a whole would write a descriptive story by the end of the session. There were a few looks of surprise – even from me, as this was not what I had expected.

By way of introduction the learners had to do a simple poem with their name, likes, dislikes and aspirations. This was done in such a simple way and proved to be a real ice-breaker. Some of the learners were very shy and there were lots of giggles and calling of friend’s names to read their poem rather than their own.
The learners then had to close their eyes and visualise four things which they did when they woke up in the morning. They then had to write this down. The expression on some of the learners’ faces was despairing as if to say, Oh no, do I really have to do this!

One learner asked if they could write on the next page. Nandi’s response was: “It is your book – you can write anywhere in it. Start at the back in the middle or the front – you can do what you like!”

The learners were asked to use two adjectives to describe their feelings, smell and touch. It took a little while to get the imagination going and needless to say we did not ask them to read what they had written.
They were then given a descriptive writing lesson with “Riding In A Taxi” as a topic. This was great fun. They were taught how to brainstorm the topic with ideas and once this was done each group selected a topic about the taxi. There was much giggling and looks of disbelief when they were told that neither Sive or I had been in a taxi and they needed to describe as much as possible so that we could really believe we had been in a taxi.

Topics chosen were Driver, Conductor, Passengers, Sound and Smell. Each group member had to choose four sentences about their group’s chosen topic. Out of this, one sentence was taken from each member to form a paragraph. One person from each group was chosen to read what the group had written. Whilst this was happening a call came over the loudspeaker for the head of class to go to the hall. She would not lift her head from her work she was so intent on what she was doing. When they came to call her – the response was: “I am busy – in a workshop with FunDza”.

Nandi gave an introduction to the story. The group each read out their paragraphs. Some of the descriptions of the sights and smell, the driver, etc., were hilarious. From babies crying, to women gossiping at the top of their voices, drivers driving like maniacs, conductors collecting money and whistling for other passengers from the street etc., – what fun!
Nandi gave a conclusion and guess what – we had our first group descriptive essay! By the end of the class the learners were totally relaxed and smiling. Sive showed the learners some of the video he had taken and they were really pleased. When we were leaving some of the learners asked us when we were coming back and to come back again soon.

What a lovely warm feeling I had! This was a very uplifting time for me – what a privilege to work for such an awesome organisation. Thanks guys for the amazing work you do and how proud I am to be part of FunDza. You guys rock!

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