Pgce Personal Statement Examples Primary Strengths

Your personal statement is the heart of your application for work as a newly qualified teacher and should be re-written for each role. This is your opportunity to provide evidence of how you match the needs of the specific teaching job you are applying for, and earn yourself an invitation to the next stage, which is likely to be a selection day held at the school.

Writing tips for personal statements

See our example personal statement for primary teaching and personal statement for secondary teaching for further guidance.

When completing a personal statement for a teaching job you should usually observe the following guidelines:

  • Do not exceed two sides of A4, unless otherwise instructed.
  • Tailor your statement for each new application according to the nature of the school or LA and the advertised role.
  • Emphasise your individual strengths in relation to the role.
  • Consider using the government's Teachers' Standards to structure your statement, or follow the structure of the person specification.
  • For a pool application, make sure you give a good overview of your skills and experience.
  • It is essential that you give specific examples of what you have done to back up your claims.

What you must cover in your personal statement

Why you are applying for the role:

  • Refer to any knowledge you have of the LA or the school, including any visits to the school and what you learnt from them.
  • Mention any special circumstances, for example, your religious faith, which you think are relevant.

Details about your course:

  • Give an overview of your training course, including the age range and subjects covered, and any special features.
  • If you are a PGCE student, mention your first degree, your dissertation (if appropriate), any classroom-based research projects and relevant modules studied. Also mention if you have studied any masters modules.

Your teaching experience:

  • What year groups you have taught.
  • What subjects you have covered.
  • Any use of assessment strategies or special features of the practices, for example, open-plan, multi-ethnic, team teaching.

Your classroom management strategies:

  • Give examples of how you planned and delivered lessons and monitored and evaluated learning outcomes, including differentiation.
  • Explain how you have managed classrooms and behaviour.
  • Detail your experience of working with assistants or parents in your class.

Your visions and beliefs about primary/secondary education:

  • What are your beliefs about learning and your visions for the future? You could touch on areas such as learning and teaching styles and strategies.
  • Reflect on key policies relevant to the age range you want to teach.

Other related experience:

  • This can include information about any previous work experience.
  • Include training activities you have carried out and ways in which your subject knowledge has been developed.

Other related skills and interests:

  • Give details of any particular competencies, experiences or leisure interests, which will help the school to know more about you as a person.
  • Any involvement in working with children (running clubs, youth work and summer camps) is particularly useful to note.

Aim to end on a positive note. A conclusion which displays your enthusiasm in relation to the specific application and teaching in general will enhance your application, but avoid general statements and clichés.

The personal statement is your opportunity to let training providers know about your qualities, skills and expertise, and why you want to teach.

You can only complete one personal statement for all the choices you make in both Apply 1 and Apply 2. You can’t change it or create different ones for university or school-based choices. The providers you’re applying to understand this, so they won’t be expecting you to say specific things about them or their programmes. However, if you’re applying for programmes in a particular subject or age group, it would be helpful to explain why you have chosen them, and the skills and attributes you have that make them appropriate for you.


I read hundreds of UCAS applications for teacher training every year, and I cannot stress how important the personal statement is.
Claire Harnden, Director of Initial Teacher Training at Surrey South Farnham SCITT

What to include

You do need to think carefully about the things that all your chosen providers will want to know about you. You’ll probably want to include things like:

  • your reason(s) for wanting to teach
  • evidence that you understand the rewards and challenges of teaching
  • details of your previous education and how you have benefitted from it
  • any other work with young people, such as helping with a youth club, working at a summer camp or running a sports team
  • the range of relevant abilities and skills you can bring to teaching, for example, practical experience, managing people, working with or leading a team, and communication skills
  • any reasons why there may be restrictions on your geographical mobility
  • why you want to study in the UK, if you don’t currently live here
  • whether you’ve taken part in the School Experience Programme (SEP) organised by the National College of School Leadership (formerly the Teaching Agency)

These are the things all training providers want to know – whether they’re School Direct, a university or a SCITT – so there’s no need to worry that you can’t write different personal statements. Read what SCITT director, Claire Harnden, looks for in a teacher training personal statement.

In addition to the details you give in the school and work experience section, you can also expand on your experience of teaching, such as visits to schools, classroom observations or working as a teaching assistant. To help, read Chris Chivers' tips for completing your teacher training application.

Whatever the route, the process will have similar elements, which are worth considering, so that the appliation has the greatest chance of making an impression.
Chris Chivers, experienced ITT tutor and mentor


How to write it

You can use up to 4,000 characters or 47 lines of text (including spaces) – whichever comes first. Some word processing packages calculate character and line counts differently from the UCAS Teacher Training system, so you might need to redraft your statement if there’s a discrepancy between the counts.

  • Write in English (or Welsh if you’re applying to Welsh providers) and avoid italics, bold or underlining.
  • Get the grammar and punctuation right and redraft your statement until you’re happy with it.
  • It’s a good idea to write your personal statement in a word processor first, then copy and paste it into your application.

Don’t copy!

Don’t copy anyone else’s personal statement or from statements posted on the internet. Make sure your personal statement is all your own work.

We screen all personal statements across our Copycatch similarity detection system. If we find any similarity, your application will be flagged – you and all your choices will receive an email alert and this could have serious consequences for your application.


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