Censorship In Fahrenheit 451 Essay

Censorship In Fahrenheit 451 Essay

Censorship in Fahrenheit 451 In Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, the people live in a society full of censorship.

Montag, the main character of the story, is inspired by a young girl to question law around him and begins to have doubts about what good they serve. In Fahrenheit 451, censorship in the world consists of book burning, manipulative parlor families, and the intolerance of those who attempt to be an individual.

Book burning in the story is done by firemen to supposedly prevent society from unhappy emotions and unjust thoughts. Any person who was perceived or proved to possess any sort of reading material was reported to firemen using alarms, which were sent to the fire station. On duty firemen then immediately went to the home of the lawbreaker and burnt the books discovered. Books would be covered in kerosene and torched with a flame-thrower. Houses were made fireproof in order for the firemen to burn the books inside the house without causing too much destruction. Immediately after the books are burned, the offender is arrested and taken to prison. Although book burning was the most abrupt and outlandish form of censorship, people experienced mind censorship in their homes every day.

Parlor walls were walls in a room used for watching television and specially designed "interactive" programs, designed to provide people with pleasure. Shows written for the soul purpose to please people in their parlors were watched on the walls.

A script would be written with the home...

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Essay about Fahrenheit 451 as a Criticism of Censorship

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Fahrenheit 451 as a Criticism of Censorship

Ray Bradbury criticizes the censorship of the early 1950's by displaying these same themes in a futuristic dystopia novel called Fahrenheit 451. In the early 1950's Ray Bradbury writes this novel as an extended version of "The Fireman", a short story which first appears in Galaxy magazine. He tries to show the readers how terrible censorship and mindless conformity is by writing about this in his novel.

In Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury uses "artificial stimulus", such as television and radio, to provide the reader with a feeling of how isolated the public is and how their minds are being controlled by this conformist government in the twenty-first century. He uses…show more content…

One example of this is the three-walled television in Guy Montag's living room. His wife, Mildred, watches TV all day and soaks up all the mindless programming and propaganda being fed to her. She has lost almost all of her short-term memory because of this. In one scene Mildred is asked about something that happens in a TV show she's watching and she cannot remember what is going on, even though less than a few minutes have passed. She also displays this behavior when Montag asks her to get him some aspirin when he has a headache. After she leaves the room, she returns with out the aspirin and any remembrance of Montag's request.

Bradbury again shows the emptiness of Mildred, a product of the conformist government, when she is using the "seashell thimbles." These are small, high fidelity earphones. They send Mildred music, commercials, and other information for her to consume. Advertisements such as two-hundred foot billboards that line the highways, blocking out any natural scenery, promote conformity and consumerism. Captain Beatty, Montag's boss, describes the logic behind the advertisements and television programs: Cram them full of noncombustible data, chock them so full of `facts' they feel stuffed, but absolutely `brilliant' with information. Then they'll feel they're thinking, they'll get a sense of motion without moving. And they'll be happy, because facts or that sort don't change. Don't give them any slippery like philosophy or

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